Nurture creativity with a drawing projector for kids.

Young kids are joyfully creative. Their imagination, originality and natural exuberance are what make them so playful. For kids, creative expression isn’t necessarily about the product they create---it’s about the process. Any time you can enhance the process, you nurture creativity. 

 

Drawing projector for kids

Drawing is a favorite creative activity for kids. How and what they draw depends on their stage of development. At five and six years old, perspective isn’t important; color, images and story are. As kids get older, they become more critical of their skills, paying closer attention to details and proportions. Sometimes they’ll draw a favorite image over and over again, embellishing each iteration. Using a drawing projector for kids nurtures their creativity by giving them new ways to try out ideas, boosting their confidence and letting them see the unique results of their own efforts.

Flycatcher’s smART Sketcher drawing projectors encourage kids to draw fearlessly. With multiple themed activities right out of the box and the option for endless projections using your own photos, it can appeal to different ages and abilities. Here are some of the best ways you can help boost any child’s creativity using a drawing projector. 

Foster your child’s interests. 

Your child loves dinosaurs? Pop in a dinosaur cartridge and let them draw a prehistoric population. Cars? Take pictures of vehicles on your smart phone and download them to the projector. Dogs? Food? Family? Start with what you know they love.

smART sketcher® 2.0 Dinosaur Adventures Creativity Packs

Build emotional intelligence. 

Use language to describe feelings about the pictures. Discuss how different colors create different moods. Encourage your child to express themselves. The more words they can attach to emotions, the better. 

Encourage risk-taking and do-overs!

One advantage of using a drawing projector for kids is being able to recreate the same image again and again. See what happens when your child makes the same sketch using crayons versus a pencil or colored pencils. Which does he or she like better? And why? Change the colors of the same image. Or add details. It’s all okay! 

Praise the process.

Remember it’s the process of creating that’s important. That’s where play happens. It’s not just about the final product.

Create a calm environment.

Give your child the time and the space for drawing. Don’t rush the process. 

Keep the creativity flowing.

Encourage storytelling about each picture. Ask “what if?” Don’t end the fun when the drawing is done.